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This month, I had the fun opportunity to attend a two night workshop at Bodie State Historic Park in Eastern California. This was my second chance to photograph the stars at Bodie, and I was quite excited to have another chance.  It's an amazing opportunity to be in a state park after it closes with a total of 12 photographers free to roam and shoot until 1:00 am.

Having been there last year, I was able to go with a few ideas as to what I would like to try.  Having two nights allowed me to go back with fresh ideas after seeing what I was able to do the first night.

If you just want to see the album, head on over to:

https://www.castleintheair.photos/doug/koken/albums/bodie-night-workshop/

I went out the night before to Mono Lake.  We had shot there last year, so I was familiar with it and felt that it was a good place to "tune up."

I wandered around before dark and chose this location to set up:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median
Made from 16 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

I also set up a star trail shot with my other camera:

Mono Lake was amazingly calm this night which is very unusual for such a large lake.  Check out the star reflections in the lake:

Made from 16 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

Now on to the Bodie nights :-).

Before it got dark the first night, I did some shooting the late sun coming into some of the buildings:

Having played with star reflections in water, I went to Bodie with the idea of trying to catch reflections of stars or even perhaps the Milky Way in some of the windows of the buildings.  I had pre-scouted possible locations using maps, but I found that a number of those wouldn't work.  However, once I got there, I wandered around looking for possible candidates and this is my favorite from the first night:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

I had also set up a star trail shot at a location I had been at last year and wanted to try again:

And here is the same location without star trails:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

Here are a couple more from the first night:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

On the second night, before it got dark, I some more windows ideas, and this ended up being my favorite:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

I managed to squeeze in two star trail sequences.  The first was a location I scouted out and thought I'd give a try on my own.  The second was one that a number of people tried as well as some light painting.

This was a shed that the group had set up an interior light, and since it was right by my first star trail attempt, I played with it right after setting the star trail shot up:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

And then some other group light painting shots that we did:

Made from 8 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median
Made from 4 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median
Made from 4 light frames (captured with a FUJIFILM camera) by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.6.2. Algorithm: Median

I definitely had a fun time, and it was really good to have the in depth time to explore possibilities beyond what we were able to do last year in one shorter night.